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Animation by Kenneth Grzymala

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Top 10

#PrideMonth

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What to do, what to see and what to know this June in honor of LGBTQ Pride Month...

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1. The Origins
First things first: the background. Pride takes place in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots, which kicked off on June 28, 1969, in New York's Greenwich Village. That morning, police raided the gay bar, Stonewall Inn (a version of which is still around today). For six days, the people fought back. Today, it's considered the milestone moment that launched the LGBTQ rights movement in the U.S. Learn more in the documentary Stonewall Uprising, available to stream here.

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2. Walk This Way
Pride can't be cancelled, even if COVID-19 puts a halt on its renowned parades. Celebrations are now going virtual—click here, here and here for a list of events around the world. And don't forget the the 24-hour bash for Global Pride on June 27, featuring performances by Olivia Newton-John, Deborah Cox, Dixie Chicks and others.

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3. More Save the Dates
The digital festivities don't stop there. Party highlights include Pride Prom on June 13, sponsored by The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard magazines (Cyndi Lauper! Tove Lo! Billy Porter!); Pride 2020 Dragfest on June 19-21 (over 100 queens!) and Out Now Live on June 22, a special extravaganza hosted by Them., starring a whole constellation of famous faces. Participating names include Naomi Campbell, Cynthia Nixon, Tegan and Sara, British Vogue's Edward Enninful, Billy Eichner, Evan Rachel Wood, Whoopi Goldberg, Judith Light…

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Marsha P. Johnson, courtesy of Netflix from the documentary The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson

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4. The Movers & Shakers
It wasn't too long ago that same-sex couples couldn't hold hands in public. Marriage wasn't an option. Few public figures, if any, were "out." Things have changed and, while there are still ways to go and much to do, it's important to recognize the pioneers who have led the way. People like Marsha P. Johnson, the transgender activist, who helped lead the uprisings at Stonewall Inn and founded STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) to help transgender and homeless youth. And Brenda Howard, a.k.a. Mother of Pride, who coordinated the first Pride march in 1970. And Audre Lorde, the self-described "black lesbian mother warrior poet," who founded Sisterhood in Support of Sisters in South Africa. And Harvey Milk, the first openly gay person elected to public office. And Bayard Rustin, who, in addition to working with Martin Luther King Jr. on civil rights, was also an advocate for gay rights. And… so many more. Check out a list here.

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5. Kids Incorporated
A more inclusive future, full of love, compassion and kindness, starts at home. Teach your kids to embrace differences with these LGBTQ-friendly children's books: Red: A Crayon's Story, The Great Big Book of Families, A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo, And Tango Makes Three and Peanut Goes for the Gold.

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6. Pay It Forward (Literally)
Make a donation to the many LGBTQ nonprofits making a difference—like The Trevor Project, The Human Rights Campaign and GLAAD—and support your local LGBTQ-owned businesses. Don't know where to start for the latter? Many cities and states—New York, for example—offer listings.

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7. True Colors
Everyone is familiar with the rainbow flag, but did you know that each color represents something different? The original, designed by Gilbert Baker, actually had eight colors, not the current six—pink symbolized sexuality; red, life; orange, healing; yellow, sunlight; green, nature; turquoise, magic and art; indigo, harmony, and purple, spirit. "The rainbow is a part of nature, and you have to be in the right place to see it," he wrote. "It's beautiful, all of the colors, even the colors you can't see. That really fit us as a people because we are all of the colors. Our sexuality is all of the colors. We are all the genders, races, and ages."

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The Spread Love Project spotted in New York City, photograph courtesy of Nicholas Konert; the Spread Love heart is a registered trademark of Nicholas Konert

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8. And Speaking of Rainbows
Spread love to your friends and family with Nicholas Konert's rainbow hearts—seen all over the streets of New York City (and beyond!). Shop his Spread Love Project collection of stickers, pins, prints and postcards, listen to his playlists with Brooklyn-based DJs in support of LGBTQ healthcare provider Callen-Lorde, and then head over to read our interview with the multi-hyphenate creative himself.

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9. Lights, Camera… Movie Night!
Some of our favorites include Moonlight, Milk, Bessie, BPM, Call Me By Your Name, Happy Together, Pariah, Tomboy, Billy Elliot, Boys Don't Cry and Paris is Burning. And to learn more about the inspiring Marsha P. Johnson, mentioned above, watch the Netflix documentary, The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson.

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10. Let the Music Play
Spotify has put together an incredible playlist dedicated to Pride month. With tracks by Tegan and Sara, Soft Cell, Diana Ross, David Bowie, Queen, Lady Gaga, Whitney Houston, ABBA, Frank Ocean, Cher, and tons more, it's an absolute mood-lifter all 365 days of the year, not just June. Listen here and get that Zoom dance party going...

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